Radiant Heat Flux Measurements Utilizing a Gardon Gauge

 

As already mentioned in the article Schmidt-Boelter and Gardon radiometer heat flux sensors, a Gardon radiometer sensor can be used to measure radiant heat flux.

 

The content of this article describes a scientific method for measuring the radiant heat flux of electric infrared heaters, utilizing a Gardon sensor.

Gardon radiometer sensor used in the study for measuring the radiant heat flux of electric infrared heaters; source: Michelle Tannam, BAI

Gardon radiometer sensor used in the study for measuring the radiant heat flux of electric infrared heaters; source: Michelle Tannam, BAI  

 

In 2012, under the supervision of Associate Professor Dr. Anthony Robinson from Trinity College Dublin, and with the support of the electric infrared heating manufacturer Ceramicx Ireland, the author completed a research paper which explored how the human thermoregulatory system responds when exposed to radiant heat from electric infrared heaters.

As part of this research, a basic testing method was developed by the author to record the temperature and heat flux distribution patterns of an electric infrared heat source over a three dimensional space.

This testing method is the focus of this study.

Wavelength range of Gardon sensor

 

As already mentioned in the article by Assistant Professor Dr. Antony Robinson, to make the results of different radiant heat flux measurement systems comparable, it is necessary to mention the sensor’s measurement wavelength range.

The Gardon gauge used in the above mentioned study included a window in front of the sensing element to screen out convection so that only radiation is measured. The window is placed directly on the copper surface of the sensor to minimize its heating, but is not in contact with the sensing element itself. The window material of the Gardon sensor was made out of quartz with a transmission of 90 percent in the spectral range of 0,3 to 3 micrometers.

 

To download the study, please click here.



author:

Michelle Tannam, BAI
Dublin, Ireland
June 2016